Tree Facts & Care

Tree Facts

  •  North Carolina has an estimated 50 million Fraser Fir Christmas Trees growing on over 30,000 acres.
  • Fraser fir represents over 96% of all species grown in North Carolina.
  • Fraser fir is grown in the far Western North Carolina counties, which include Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, Mitchell, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga and Yancey.
  • There are over 1,600 North Carolina growers.
  • The North Carolina Christmas Tree Industry is ranked second in the nation in number of trees harvested.
  • North Carolina produces over 19% of the Real Christmas Trees in the U.S.
  • The North Carolina Fraser fir has been judged the Nation’s best through a contest sponsored by the National Christmas Tree Association and chosen for the official White House Christmas tree 11 times (more than any other species)….1971, 1973, 1982, 1984, 1990, 1993, 1995, 1997, 2005, 2007 and 2008.
  • The North Carolina Fraser Fir Christmas Tree is the most popular Christmas tree in North America and is shipped into every state in the U.S. as well as the Caribbean Islands, Mexico, Canada, Bermuda, Japan and other points all over the world.
  • The North Carolina Fraser fir has soft, pleasant-to-touch needles, incomparable needle retention, long lasting aroma, and more pliable yet stronger branches for even the heaviest ornaments.
  • There are approximately 400 Choose and Cut Christmas tree farms in North Carolina.
  • Individual Christmas tree growers may sell anywhere from a few dozen trees per year to hundreds of thousands of trees per year.

Tree Care

  • You must care for your tree whether you are a retailer or consumer. Over the years, common myths and other misconceptions over the care and handling of cut Christmas trees have resulted in wasted trees, reduced tree quality, poor tree care and sometimes dissatisfied customers. Also, recent trends of setting trees up earlier during the holiday season increases the chances the trees will not meet consumer expectations of quality during the entire display period unless the trees have proper care. The market is demanding more NC grown Fraser Firs each year… Why?
  • Families are discovering Fraser Fir’s resistance to shipping stress and temperature fluctuations, its excellent needle retention, the wonderful fresh-cut aroma, and a deeper green color make it perhaps the nation’s premier Christmas tree.

Consumer Care

Do all species keep equally well after harvest?
Certain species simply last longer and remain fresh much longer than others. Some of the best are the North Carolina Fraser fir, Balsam fir, Scotch pine and Douglas-fir. Regardless of species, consumers must make the final judgment of quality by looking at, touching, feeling, smelling and shaking the tree.
How much of the trunk should be cut off before setting up the tree?
Removing a thin disk (1/4 to 1/2 inch) off the trunk before placing the tree in a water holding stand is all that is needed. It is always a good practice to make a new cut before putting the tree into the stand.
What is the minimum amount of water a tree stand should hold?
As a general rule, a tree can use up to a quart of water per day for each inch of stem diameter. The warmer the temperature and the lower the relative humidity where the tree is displayed, the greater the amount of water required by the tree.
If the base of the trunk has a split, will this affect the quality of the tree?
It should not affect the ability of the tree to take up water, assuming a fresh cut is made on the base, nor have any effect on how long the tree lasts after it is displayed.

Christmas Tree Safety

Be Safe With Your Tree

Christmas trees do not start fires, people do! Here are some helpful hints so that you and your family can enjoy the Christmas season and your Fraser fir tree to the fullest.

  • Check all electric lights and connections before decorating. Don’t use any lights      with worn or frayed cords.
  • NEVER use lighted candles on your tree.
  • Don’t overload the electrical outlets.
  • Place your tree away from fireplaces, radiators, television sets, and other heat sources.  These elements can prematurely dry out your tree.
  • Always make sure that your tree has plenty of water to prevent drying.
  • ALWAYS turn off all decorations before going to bed at night or anytime that you leave home.

Sensible precautions like these will help you and your family have a safe and happy holiday season. Remember that it is not the trees that cause the fires!

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